The spanish armada

Print this page The drift into war Philip II was born six years before Elizabeth I in and died five years before her in Quite unusually for reigning monarchs of that period, they actually met.

The spanish armada

Print this page The drift into war Philip II was born six years before Elizabeth I in and died five years before her in Between them 'el rey prudente' the prudent king and the virgin queen dominated the second half of the sixteenth century.

Quite unusually for reigning monarchs of that period, they actually met.

The spanish armada

This occurred in May while Philip was king consort of England and when Elizabeth was brought to Hampton Court after her imprisonment at Woodstock. Neither has left any personal recollections of the meeting, but from the wariness with which they treated each other thereafter no great rapport seems to have been established.

But Philip did harbour a grievance. He claimed the credit for bringing Elizabeth back to court and arranging a reconciliation with her half-sister according to one account he observed the meeting between them from hiding.

It was at this point that his doubts about Mary's ability to conceive were confirmed by her hysterical pregnancy, and in the absence of an heir of their bodies he gave his support to Elizabeth's ultimately uncontested accession in This assistance she refused to acknowledge.

Backing Elizabeth was not a comfortable decision, for he harboured few illusions about her religious allegiances and he appreciated that he was probably abandoning English Catholics to their fate.

A sense of responsibility inspired his offer of marriage to her in - a gesture strongly opposed in Spain - and lasted for the rest of his life.

He claimed the credit for bringing Elizabeth back to court The steady decline in relations between England and Spain after makes it tempting to see a certain inevitability in the hostilities that broke out in and dominated the last years of Philip's and Elizabeth's lives.

Yet it was not a conflict that either of them sought and war was never formally declared. The drift into war meant that a number of fluctuating issues and pressures became involved and assigning precise causes is not easy.

But, if there is one, it is undoubtedly what became known in the Catholic world as the Empresa de Inglaterra the Enterprise of Englandthe overthrow of the new Protestant regime. Top Early plans for invasion The earliest scheme for an invasion of England dates from the summer ofa proposal to Philip that his voyage down the Channel to return to Spain provided an excellent opportunity to make an armed landing.

This he rejected as too rash, a caution he maintained for over two decades. He was faced then and throughout his reign with the range of demands that his widespread domains presented. If his sense of moral obligation to protect English Catholicism was very real, this had to be balanced against what were considered greater priorities.

Moreover, given that Elizabeth's treatment of English Catholics during the first decade of her reign was in fact quite moderate, there was every reason not to provoke her into harsher methods. Stability in north-western Europe was Philip's immediate aim, and to that end he also urged the Papacy to avoid doing anything rash.

Philip had no illusions about the strength of English naval power.

Background to the invasion

This assessment changed when full-scale revolt broke out in the Netherlands at the end of the s, but the revolt also created an almost insoluble dilemma. The clear priority was bringing the rebellion to an end, but many of Philip's councillors claimed it was instigated from London and argued that the Empresa de Inglaterra was the necessary first step to success over the rebels.A summary of the Spanish Armada.

In the late 16th century, Spain was the most powerful empire in the known world. Spain's king, Philip II, ruled much of the New World. and much of western Europe.

Citation Information

The Spanish Armada (Spanish language: Grande y Felicísima Armada or Armada Invencible, literally "Great and Most Fortunate Navy" or "Invincible Fleet") was the Spanish fleet that sailed against England in The Armada suffered a decisive defeat and accomplished ashio-midori.com Howard of Effingham Francis Drake Justinus van Nassau: Duke of Medina Sidonia.

The Spanish Armada (Spanish: Grande y Felicísima Armada, literally "Great and Most Fortunate Navy") was a Spanish fleet of ships that sailed from A Coruña in late May , under the command of the Duke of Medina Sidonia, with the purpose of escorting an army from Flanders to invade England.

Popular history dictates that the defeat of the Spanish Armada was a David versus Goliath victory, snatched by plucky and outnumbered English forces.

In this tightly written and fascinating new history, Robert Hutchinson explodes this myth, revealing the true destroyers of the Spanish Armada―inclement weather and bad luck/5(6). The Spanish Armada or Great Armada was the Spanish fleet that sailed against England under the command of the Duke of Medina Sidona in The Armada consisted of about warships and converted merchant ships.

At first the aim of the Spanish Armada was to liberate the captive Queen of Scots, but when Mary was executed for conspiring Elizabeth's death in , Philip planned to invade England in the name of his daughter, the Infanta Isabella.

Spanish Armada | Definition, Defeat, & Facts | ashio-midori.com